How Dangerous is Your Demo?

By David Duffett
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With AstriCon looming, now is the time to be thinking about your Dangerous Demo!

As mentioned previously, legendary Brit James Body, pictured below in all his glory, will be presiding over a bumper Dangerous Demo session early Wednesday (September 28) evening. And so it is incumbent upon any self-respecting Asterisk geek to be at least thinking about what kind of Dangerous Demo he or she may attempt!

The one, the only - James Body

The one, the only – James Body

I say “attempt” because part of the ‘danger’ element of a Dangerous Demo is the possibility that it might not work! And we have a prize for that – it’s called the ‘Crash and Burn’ prize, and it’s awarded for an audacious attempt at something that spectacularly (or, quite quietly in some cases) fails!

The other “danger” element is that of actual physical danger, an example of which would be the now infamous Ben Klang Asterisk-powered Missile Launcher. Any demo in which people have to duck to avoid being hit by something can definitely be considered dangerous.

Some of you might be thinking, “I have a demo, but it is not that visual.” Don’t worry. We have prize for that, too. It’s called the ‘Swan’ prize. This prize signifies that while, above the water, there is not much going on; below the water, there is a lot of activity creating the motion.

By the way, there are MORE PRIZES this year. Alongside the much sought after laser-glass trophies, there are further high quality items to be won like Bose headphones and a Bluetooth Speaker.

So step up, rise to the challenge and prepare your very own Dangerous Demo. You will be competing against fellow Asterisk Community members, Asterisk Dev teamsters and other fine folk…

The flow is fast and furious with each competitor getting only 5 minutes to do their Demo. To keep things flowing nicely, two podiums are used so that while one Demo is being delivered, the next one is being prepped.

Once you have thought up your Dangerous Demo, send a quick e-mail with contact details and outline of what you might like to show to James.body@truphone.com

If you would like a sneak peak at draft ‘batting order’ then take a look here. The intriguing titles alone should cause you to RUN not WALK to this years Dangerous Demos – “Defending the Crash & Burn”, “HOMER, HOMER on the Range”, “Back off the Judges Bench”, and “Anything but Howling Monkies!”

For more information, and a brief history of the Dangerous Demo concept, check out this Asterisk Live video with James explaining how he came up with the idea…

AstriCon is such a great Community get-together for participation of all levels, whether running a session, delivering a Dangerous Demo, chatting in the ‘Hallway track’ or throwing a question out during a talk.

And we’re really looking forward to seeing you there! Check out all the details of this year’s Astricon. 

All the best!

There's One Comment

  • Thank you for sharing these tips, David. Astricon was awesome last year and the product demos were amazing. I think people should not settle for just their ordinary product demo in attending conferences. It should be tailor-fit with the specific occasion. Since you have some good tips here, David, let me share mine but on the other side of doing demos. This is more of what-not-to-do rather than must-do tips: https://www.tenfold.com/sales-performance/awful-product-demos

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About the Author

David Duffett

David works with the Worldwide Asterisk Community for Digium, and is an Asterisk enthusiast in addition to being a Chartered Engineer, globally experienced trainer and public speaker. His experience includes Air Traffic Control communications, Wireless Local Loop, Mobile Networks, Computer Telephony, Voice over IP and Asterisk specifically. In addition to many web articles, David's publications include Asterisk 1.4: The Professional's Guide (Packt, co-author) and the contribution of a chapter (on Internationalisation) to Asterisk: The Definitive Guide (O'Reilly). David is editorially responsible for AstriCon (THE annual global Asterisk event) where he also introduced the 'Fastest Dude to the Dialtone' contest some years ago. He is a frequent speaker at AsterConference Asia (David has also MC'd at this event), IT Expo (East and West) and a number of corporate events. He has also spoken at numerous other conferences - VoIP Developer, Speech World, CT Expo and UC Expo to name a few.

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