The Rise of the Open Source Contact Center

By Pete Engler
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Rise of open source contact centers

Today’s contributed article is from guest blogger, Kevin Levi, of OrecX, and provides a closer look at the use of open source solutions in contact centers. OrecX is a long-time builder of Asterisk-based solutions. 

According to an annual survey called “Future of Open Source” reported in NetworkWorld, nearly 70 percent of organizations (of the 1,300 polled) are actively involved in open source projects.

According to North Bridge general partner Paul Santinelli, “Open source today is unequivocally the engine of innovation,” he said in a statement. “Whether that’s powering technology like operating systems, cloud, big data or IoT, or powering a new generation of open source companies delivering compelling solutions to the market.”

Almost two thirds of respondents in the same survey also indicated they are employing open source solutions for their customer-facing operations. This data supports what we already know, that open source call centers are on the rise and for good reason!

Open-source based call centers – using the likes of Asterisk and/or OrecX (open source call recording) – provide many advantages over non-open-source environments, including:

  • Quality improvement and cost savings – from the survey: “Open source has reached a depth and maturity where quality, access to code and costs are no longer barriers to adoption.”
  • Customization – designed for developers to adapt and extend
  • Nimble – adapt to new trends faster than proprietary systems
  • Openness – designed with integration in mind
  • Fast bug and security updates – rapidly determine and fix any issues

According to Forrester Research, “As enterprises’ adoption of open source software matures, they are likely to find more value beyond saving money on software license costs, low barriers to entry, and rapid evolution of successful open source projects. The open source paradigm embraces an even more important long-term benefit–a more innovative IT shop that can rapidly adapt to changing technologies and seize new opportunities as higher-level open source infrastructure projects mature. This combination of upfront cost savings and improved time-to-market will become a powerful weapon for those shops that can wield it strategically as a way to maximize the effectiveness of their software investments.”

The open source contact center landscape is growing but today it is being pioneered by a handful of innovative companies, including:

Open source contact center

Image above taken from Keynote speech given by Clint Oram, CTO of SugarCRM titled “Let’s Get Real: Open Source & Contact Centers”.

 

open source contact center

Kevin Levi is VP of Marketing at OrecX. Prior to joining OrecX, Kevin spent 10+ years working in the contact center industry supporting NICE Systems, VPI – Voiceprint International, CyberTech International and other solution providers.

Download  “Benefits of Open Source Call Recording” white paper

 

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About the Author

Pete Engler

Pete Engler is the Channel Marketing Manager at Digium. He joined the company in 2008 as the Product Manager for Asterisk hardware products before moving to Marketing. Prior to Digium, he served as a Product Manager in the Enterprise and SMB teams with Avocent Corporation, Applications Engineering at ADTRAN and 10 years in Information Technology as a Desktop and Network Administrator. As Channel Marketing Manager, Pete is responsible for channel marketing and lead gen programs for Digium’s worldwide network of partners, as well as marketing campaigns that continue to drive demand for Digium’s portfolio of telephony products, including Switchvox Unified Communications phone systems and Switchvox Cloud; and products for custom communications projects with open source Asterisk.

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